Fellowships, Scholarships, and Language/Study Abroad/Summer Programs

 

1.  American Institute for Foreign Study (AIFS) Study Abroad Scholarships, Grants, and Financial Support – Each year, more than $800,000 in scholarships, grants and financial support is awarded to deserving students & institutions.  Funds are available for both summer and semester programs. The scholarships are not available to students on AIFS customized faculty-led programs. If you are participating in a program through your school, check with the study abroad director for details of any special AIFS scholarships that may be available.

2.  Arabic Language Institute in Fez (Fez, Morocco) – The Arabic Language Institute in Fez (ALIF) offers three and six-week courses in all levels of Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Moroccan Arabic.

3.  Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship (Institute of International Education-IIE) – The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program offers a competition for awards for undergraduate study abroad and was established by the International Academic Opportunity Act of 2000.  This scholarship provides awards for U.S. undergraduate students who are receiving federal Pell Grant Funding at a 2-year or 4-year college or university to participate in study abroad programs worldwide.  Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, this congressionally-funded program is administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE) through its Southern Regional Center in Houston, Texas.

4.  Blakemore Freeman Fellowships (The Blakemore Foundation) – Blakemore Freeman Fellowships are awarded for one academic year of advanced level language study in East or Southeast Asia. Eligible languages are Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Burmese, Indonesian, Khmer, Thai, and Vietnamese.  The Blakemore Foundation makes grants for study only at specific language programs. Please refer to the current list of approved programs.

5.  Boren Fellowships (National Security Education Program – NSEP) – Boren Fellowships, an initiative of the National Security Education Program, provide unique funding opportunities for U.S. graduate students to study less commonly taught languages in world regions critical to U.S. interests, and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded.  Boren Fellows represent a vital pool of highly motivated individuals who wish to work in the federal national security arena. In exchange for funding, Boren Fellows commit to working in the federal government for at least one year after graduation.

6.  Boren Scholarships (National Security Education Program – NSEP) – Boren Scholarships, an initiative of the National Security Education Program, provide unique funding opportunities for U.S. undergraduate students to study less commonly taught languages in world regions critical to U.S. interests, and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded.  Boren Scholars represent a vital pool of highly motivated individuals who wish to work in the federal national security arena.  In exchange for funding, Boren Scholars commit to working in the federal government for at least one year after graduation.

7.  Bridging Scholarships for Study Abroad in Japan (American Association of Teachers of Japanese) – The Bridging Project offers scholarships to American undergraduate students participating in study-abroad programs in Japan. Funding from private foundations and major U.S. corporations, through donations to the nonprofit US-Japan Bridging Foundation, makes it possible to award about 100 scholarships each year to assist students with the travel and living expenses they will incur while studying abroad in Japan for a semester or an academic year. Applications are accepted twice a year for Bridging Scholarships.

8.  Charles B. Rangel Graduate Fellowship Program (Howard University) – The Charles B. Rangel Graduate Fellowship is a program that aims to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy. The Rangel Program selects outstanding Rangel Fellows annually in a highly competitive nationwide process and supports them through two years of graduate study, internships, mentoring, and professional development activities. This program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, women, and those with financial need. Fellows who successfully complete the program and Foreign Service entry requirements will receive appointments as Foreign Service Officers, one of the most exciting and rewarding careers available.

9.  Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Summer Enrichment Program (Howard University) – The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Summer Enrichment Program is a six-week summer program designed to provide undergraduate students with a deeper appreciation of current issues and trends in international affairs, a greater understanding of career opportunities in international affairs, and the enhanced knowledge and skills to pursue such careers. The Program usually selects participants (known as “Rangel Scholars”) each year from universities throughout the United States. Students live at Howard University, attend classes, and participate in a variety of programs with foreign affairs professionals at Howard and at diverse locations around Washington, DC.

10.  Critical Language Scholarship Program (American Councils for International Education) – The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) program is part of a U.S. government effort to expand dramatically the number of Americans studying and mastering critical need foreign languages. CLS institutes provide fully-funded group-based intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences for seven to ten weeks for U.S. citizen undergraduate and graduate students.  A program of the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the CLS Program offers intensive summer language institutes in fourteen critical foreign languages.

11.  Freeman Awards for Study in Asia (Freeman Foundation) – Freeman Awards for Study in Asia (Freeman-ASIA) provides scholarships for U.S. undergraduate students with demonstrated financial need to study abroad in East or Southeast Asia.  A Freeman-ASIA award provides need-based funding to assist the recipient with the cost of the study abroad program and related expenses, including airfare, basic living costs, local transportation, and books.  Freeman-ASIA accepts applications from U.S. citizens or permanent residents studying at the undergraduate level at a two-year or four-year college or university who demonstrate financial need to study abroad in East or Southeast Asia.

12.  Fulbright U.S. Student Program (U.S. Department of State) – The Fulbright U.S. Student Program offers fellowships for U.S. graduating college seniors, graduate students, young professionals and artists to study abroad for one academic year. In academic year 2006-2007, more than 1,200 Americans are studying abroad in over 140 countries with either full or partial support from the Fulbright Program.

13.   George J. Mitchell Scholarship (U.S. – Ireland Alliance) – The George J. Mitchell Scholarship is awarded annually to up to 12 Americans aged 18 to 30 who attend graduate school in Ireland or Northern Ireland.  The scholarship provides tuition, travel, and living expenses for up to one year.

14.  International Summer Program (University of Vienna) – The International Summer Program is located in the picturesque village of Strobl in the Salzkammergut region, one of Austria’s most attractive summer vacation areas. Students and faculty are accommodated in high standard single and double rooms at the program’s beautiful summer campus on the shore of Lake Wolfgang.  The four week program offers high level European Studies courses in the morning and German language courses in the afternoon. The language courses are offered at four different levels of proficiency.

15.  Japanese Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program – The JET Program is a competitive employment opportunity that allows young professionals to live and work in cities, towns, and villages throughout Japan. Being a JET is an opportunity to work and to represent the United States as cultural ambassadors to Japan. Most participants serve as Assistant Language Teachers (ALTs) and work in public and private schools throughout Japan; some work as Coordinators for International Relations (CIRs) as interpreters/translators.  The JET Program seeks participants who are adaptable, outgoing, and who have a deep interest in Japan. Only the best candidates are chosen to represent America. The JET Program typically receives 4,000-5,000 applications each year from U.S. applicants. Of these, 1,000-1,100 will be selected for participation on the JET Program.

16.  Marshall Scholarship (Marshall Commission, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, UK) – Marshall Scholarships are provided annually to up to 40 American students for up to two years of graduate education in the United Kingdom.  The scholarship covers tuition, travel, research, and living expenses.

17.  Morgan Stanley Scholarships for Study in Japan (U.S.-Japan Bridging Foundation and the American Association of Teachers of Japanese) – Underscoring its long-term commitment to education and fostering U.S.-Japan relations, Morgan Stanley, which has had a presence in Japan for more than 40 years, is proud to support the U.S.-Japan Bridging Foundation’s Bridging Project for Study Abroad in Japan.  Eligible students include students at US universities who have an interest in economics and international finance and who have been accepted for study in Japan for the academic year. Winners of the Morgan Stanley Japan Scholarships are awarded scholarships of $7,500 to help finance their studies.  Co-sponsors of the scholarships are the U.S.-Japan Bridging Foundation and the American Association of Teachers of Japanese, which will coordinate the collection of applications and the initial selection process. The final selection of scholarship recipients is made by Morgan Stanley management in Tokyo.

18.  Rhodes Scholarship (The Rhodes Trust, Oxford) – Rhodes Scholarships are awarded annually to 32 American students who pursue masters and doctoral degrees at the University of Oxford.  The scholarship covers tuition, fees, travel, and living expenses for up to three years.  Scholars are selected by regional selection committees throughout the United States.

19.  The Language Flagship (National Security Education Program) – The Language Flagship is a federally-funded effort and is a component of the National Security Education Program (NSEP) at the U.S. Department of Defense.  NSEP was created in 1991 to develop a much-needed strategic partnership between the national security community and higher education to address national needs for expertise in critical languages and regions.  NSEP is the only federally-funded effort focused on the combined issues of language proficiency, national security, and the needs of the federal workforce. In conjunction with technology and research-oriented investments, NSEP represents an integral component of a national security strategy to eliminate the serious language deficiency in the federal government.

20.  Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship (The Washington Center) – Funded by the U.S. Department of State and administered by The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, the Thomas R. Pickering Fellowship Program provides undergraduate and graduate students with financial support, mentoring and professional development to prepare them academically and professionally for a career in the U.S. Department of State Foreign Service. Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are encouraged to apply.