National Stalking Awareness Month 2016

NATIONAL STALKING AWARENESS MONTH, 2016

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION

Every person deserves to live freely and without the fear of being followed or harassed. Stalking is a violation of our fundamental freedoms, and it insults our most basic values as a Nation. Often perpetrated by those we know — and sometimes by strangers — stalking is a serious offense that occurs too frequently and goes unreported in too many cases. During National Stalking Awareness Month, we stand with victims of stalking, pledge to bring their stalkers to justice, and rededicate our efforts to ridding our schools, workplaces, and neighborhoods of this crime.

A repeated display of unwanted attention that instills fear, stalking affects people from all walks of life and makes us all less safe. Seven and a half million people are stalked in the United States each year, and 1 in 6 women will experience it at some point in their lives. People are stalked under a variety of circumstances and through a number of mediums. Text messages, emails, and phone calls are some of the most common means by which a stalker will harass someone, and offenders usually, although not always, have a prior association with the victim. Often offenders are or have been in an intimate relationship in which they have abused the victim, and in many instances stalking is a part of ongoing violence. Stalking is not only a tremendous breach of one’s privacy and liberty, but its purpose is to cause victims to feel scared or anxious, terrorizing them and sometimes causing anxiety, insomnia, social dysfunction, and depression. It also has the potential to cause post-traumatic stress symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, and being constantly on guard. It is an affront to our basic humanity, and in some cases it can lead to more violent acts by the offenders.

In 2013, I signed the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) — a groundbreaking law that recognizes stalking as the crime it is and provides more resources to victims. The Act also created new protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender victims, as well as for immigrants and Native American women. Earlier this year, I signed an Executive Order that allows victims to use sick leave for absences related to stalking and that protects victims’ privacy in the workplace. In my 2016 budget, I proposed additional funding to assist people being stalked who must make emergency moves to safer and more stable housing. And to build on these efforts, my Administration has implemented measures requiring institutions of higher education to collect and report information on stalking and other crimes as outlined in VAWA. Under the new regulations, these institutions are required to make their disciplinary processes more transparent and to provide ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns for students and employees — because our classrooms should be safe havens where everyone can pursue their dreams and fulfill their potential free from the fear of being stalked or harassed.

As we embark on a new year, let us resolve to make it one in which every person can safely and confidently make of their lives what they will. By holding stalkers accountable and providing victims and survivors with the support and assistance they need, we can ensure ours is a Nation dedicated to promoting safety, common decency, and respect.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim January 2016 as National Stalking Awareness Month. I call upon all Americans to recognize the signs of stalking, acknowledge stalking as a serious crime, and urge those affected not to be afraid to speak out or ask for help. Let us also resolve to support victims and survivors, and to create communities that are secure and supportive for all Americans.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.

Click here for more info or go to http://stalkingawarenessmonth.org/

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

DruPrintnk Driving Ruins the Holidays

Police Aim to Save Lives With ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’

If you’re enjoying the holidays with a drink, UCA Police Department has a message for you: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over. Due to the increase in drunk-driving-related fatalities around the holidays each year, law enforcement agencies across America will be actively searching for and arresting drunk drivers from December 16 to January 1. They have good reason to: in 2013, 10,076 people were killed in crashes involving a drunk driver. In December 2013 alone there were 733 people killed in crashes involving at least one driver or motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher. 23 of those deaths occurred on Christmas Day.

It’s time for all drivers to get the message.  Drunk driving is a choice you make, and when you make that choice, people get hurt or die. That’s why we’re joining with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to share the message: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.” The safest way to get home is to drive sober or catch a ride with a sober designated driver. If you plan on drinking at the holiday party or at a restaurant, hand the keys over to someone else – a sober friend, a taxi or public transportation. Or, try NHTSA’s SaferRide mobile app, which allows users to call a taxi or a friend by identifying their location so they can be picked up.

The app is available at http://ow.ly/RWs3S for Android and http://ow.ly/RWs8h for iPhone users.

As part of the national Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement campaign period, police will be increasing the number of patrols, setting up roadblocks, and using local media to reach out to all drivers. If you’re drinking and driving, UCA Police will stop you. If you’re caught drinking and driving you could face jail time, fines, loss of driver’s license, towing fees, and other DUI expenses, totaling $10,000 on average. That’s not a small price, and that doesn’t even count the heftier price you could pay: the price of your life or someone else’s.

Some people think that if they get pulled over for driving drunk, they can just refuse a breath test to avoid the DUI charge. This is not true in most jurisdictions, refusing a breath test means an automatic arrest, and the loss of your driver’s license on the spot.  The only way to truly avoid a DUI is to drive sober or designate a sober driver ahead of time. There are other options, such as calling a friend, family member, using public transportation, or calling a taxi. The cost of cab fare is nothing compared to a $10,000 DUI or the cost of someone’s life, and the ‘inconvenience’ of not driving your own car home is nothing compared to the inconvenience of spending the holidays behind bars.

In addition to reminding all drivers to drive sober, Chief Larry James is calling on everyone to be alert. “If you see a drunk driver on the road, call the police right away. If someone you know is about to drive after drinking, take their keys and help them get home safely. We’ve got to work together to make our roads safer this December and year-round”.

One of the hardest parts of a law enforcement officer’s job is making that house call and telling a family that their loved one is gone because someone chose to drink and drive. That’s why, leading up to the holidays, we will show zero tolerance for drunk drivers on the road. Please find a safe and sober ride home.

Please follow these tips to keep the holidays safe and happy:

  • Even one drink can impair your judgment and increase the risk of getting arrested for driving drunk—or worse, the risk of having a crash.
  • If you will be drinking, do not plan on driving. Plan ahead; designate a sober driver before the party begins.
  • If you have been drinking, do not drive. Call a taxi, phone a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation.
  • Remember, driving after drinking should never be an option. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.

 

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

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On Saturday, September 26th from 10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. UCAPD and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the campus community an opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes and residence halls of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your medications for disposal to UCAPD at W. J. Sowder and Marion Ross Ave. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs.

Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines-flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards.

If you cannot make it by on Saturday please know we have a permanent drop box available to the campus community 24-hours-a-day. The permanent drop box is located at the main entrance to UCAPD.

National Campus Safety Awareness Month (NCSAM)

September is National Campus Safety Awareness Month (NCSAM) and UCAPD is partnering with the UCA Community to provide a full schedule of events and programming to raise awareness and promote safety with the start of the new academic year.

Theft Prevention Week

 Operation ID – Student Center Lobby

 Wednesday, September 2nd                                              11:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

-Students, faculty, and staff will receive information on how to register valuables in Operation ID and will have the opportunity to register onsite.

Self-Defense Class – HPER

Thursday, September 3rd                                                 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

-Students, faculty, and staff will receive information on the meaning of self-defense and the laws that can protect them. Verbal Judo will be discussed and there will be hands-on instruction. Go to OrgSync to sign up.

Sexual Assault Awareness Week

 Stand Up and Speak Out Video – Student Health Center 307

Tuesday, September 8th                                                                1:40-2:30 p.m.

-UCAPD is partnering with the UCA Counseling Center to present this 20 minute video that addresses acquaintance rape and is specifically designed for college students. The last half hour students will be given some hands on techniques to help protect themselves.

 Rape Culture on Campuses- Ida Waldran Auditorium

Wednesday, September 9th                                            6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

The UCA Counseling Center will have a speaker from the Arkansas Coalition Against Sexual Assault (ACASA) speak on rape culture on college campuses. The event will be staffed by UCA Counseling Center, and UCAPD.

 Self-Defense Class – HPER

Thursday, September 10th                                              8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

-Students, faculty, and staff will receive information on the meaning of self-defense and the laws that can protect them. Verbal Judo will be discussed and there will be hands-on instruction. Go to OrgSync to sign up.

 

 Drug and Alcohol Awareness Week

Pledge Day – Amphitheatre

Monday, September 14th                                                                        all day

Members of the RSO, 80 Proof, will host a pledge event from 11:00 to 1:00. Students can sign and keep a car air freshener that poses the question, “Is it worth the risk?” By signing their name, students pledge to not drink and drive.

 The Truth About Alcohol Video – Student Health Center 307

Tuesday, September 15th                                                      1:40 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

Explains what alcohol and drugs are and what they do to your body and mind – told by people who’ve been there, done them and survived to tell about it.

 Make Smart Choices Program – Amphitheatre

Wednesday, September 16th                                            11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

– Sponsored by Student Wellness and Development, UCA Police Department, and 80 Proof. Students will have an opportunity to “Walk the Line” while wearing vision impairment goggles and interact with officers. Students who participate will receive a shirt that says Make SMART Choices. This is an idea from the National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week toolkit. Each letter in SMART stands for a prevention phrase.

S – Set Limits   M – Make a plan   A – Act to help others   R – Respect Choices of Peers   T – Talk to your friend.

Staff and officers will be educating students on these strategies as well as legal aspects of receiving a DWI, standard drink sizes, consequences of binge drinking, and having designated drivers.

 Self-Defense Class – HPER

Thursday, September 17th                                              8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

-Students, faculty, and staff will receive information on the meaning of self-defense and the laws that can protect them. Verbal Judo will be discussed and there will be hands-on instruction. Go to OrgSync to sign up.

Hazing Prevention Awareness Week

  Self-Defense Class – HPER

Thursday, September 24th                                              8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

-Students, faculty, and staff will receive information on the meaning of self-defense and the laws that can protect them. Verbal Judo will be discussed and there will be hands-on instruction. Go to OrgSync to sign up.

 

Personal Safety Week

UCAAlert System TEST- A cell phone near you!

Tuesday, September 29th                                                      1:40 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

In the event of an emergency which poses an immediate threat to the campus community, the UCA Police Department will use the UCAAlert system to notify the campus community through text/voice messages and email.

Clothes Line Project – Amphitheater

Wednesday, September 30th                                         10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

The UCA Counseling Center and the Conway Women’s Shelter presents this awareness program that focuses on domestic violence. T-shirts designed by survivors of domestic violence are displayed and the consequence (sometimes deadly) of domestic violence is outlined.

Brake for Bears! – A Crosswalk Near You!

Wednesday, September 30th                                         7:40 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

– UCAPD and the Student Government Association are once again teaming up to promote pedestrian safety through the Brake for Bears campaign. Volunteers and UCA Police officers will encourage safety awareness throughout the morning at various crosswalks around campus by distributing pedestrian safety information and, while supplies last, official Brake for Bears t-shirts. Click HERE to sign up

 

Don’t Forget!!!!

 

OPERATION GOTCHA!! SOMETIME IN SEPTEMBER SO WATCH YOUR STUFF!!

UCAPD will partner with Housing & Residence Life and Torreyson Library staff for Operation Gotcha! Officers and authorized staff will check residence halls and the library for unattended valuables and unlocked doors. Students will receive a “Gotcha” tag if items are found unattended.

 

Volunteers are needed for the Fall 2015 Brake for Bears!

To volunteer, please contact SSgt. B. Moore. at (501) 450-3111 or Click Here to sign up

 

 UCA is a safe campus and it takes all of us working together to keep it that way!

These programs and events would not be possible without the support and collaborative efforts of the following departments and student groups:

Housing and Residence Life

Student Wellness and Development

Student Life

Greek Life

UCA Counseling Center

Diversity and Community

Physical Plant

SGA

All Greek Council

80 Proof

UCA Athletics

UCA Band

Torreyson Library

Executive Staff

Prescription Drug Take Back Event

On Saturday, April 25 from 10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. UCAPD and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the campus community an opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes and residence halls of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your medications for disposal to UCAPD at W. J. Sowder and Marion Ross Ave. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs.

Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines-flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards.

If you cannot make it by on Saturday please know we have a permanent drop box available to the campus community 24-hours-a-day. The permanent drop box is located at the main entrance to UCAPD.

CAMPUS SAFETY BULLETIN – Suspect in Custody

CAMPUS SAFETY BULLETIN – *SUSPECT IN CUSTODY*

On the evening of Monday, April 13, UCA Police received multiple reports from students regarding a male in a green SUV driving up to pedestrians on campus and randomly asking them if they needed a ride. On one of these reported occasions the suspect solicited sexual favors for money. The vigilance of these concerned students resulted in the apprehension of a non-student who was charged with Driving While Intoxicated and Sexual Solicitation. We wanted to take this opportunity to encourage all of our students, faculty, and staff to always report any suspicious activity to us immediately. It is the “See Something, Say Something” mentality on our campus that helps to keep UCA a safe place to live, work, and learn.

Please take note of the following personal safety precautions:

  • Do not accept rides from someone you do not know.
  • If you notice anything suspicious, contact UCA Police immediately by dialing 9-1-1 or (501) 450-3111.
  • Always carry a cell phone.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings and of the activities of people around you.
  • When traveling after dark, always walk with a friend or with a group.
  • Park in well-lit areas.
  • Follow your gut instincts. If your intuition tells you that you are at risk, leave the situation quickly. If you see someone suspicious in a parking lot, building or anywhere on campus, leave the area and call the UCA Police at (501) 450-3111 or call 911.
  • If you feel unsafe walking on campus, contact the UCA Police Department and request a free safety escort.

 

Distracted Driving Awareness Month

April is National Distracted Driving Awareness month and we would like to encourage all of our students, faculty, and staff to put an end to this life-threatening practice.

The Hands-Free Myth

Do you think using a hands-free device – whether it’s an earpiece or a dashboard infotainment system – is the safe way to drive and talk on the phone?

If so, you’re not alone. A recent National Safety Council poll shows that 80% of U.S. drivers believe handsfree cell phones are safer than using handheld. However, it’s just not true. More than 30 studies show that using hands-free systems provide drivers no safety benefit. Even with both hands on the wheel and your eyes on the road, your mind is distracted from the task of driving. Think about it, people have been driving stick shift for decades – the issue is not about keeping two hands on the wheel. The NSC poll also found that 53 percent of respondents believe hands-free devices must be safe to use if they are built into vehicles. Add to that many state laws requiring people to use hands-free, and it’s no wonder there’s confusion.

The results are in:
1. Hands-free features in dashboards actually increase mental distraction*

2. Using voice-to-text is more distracting than typing texts while driving**

3. Drivers who text with their hands or voice (using speech-to-text systems) keep their eyes on the road less often and have reaction times twice as slow**

Learn why at nsc.org/cellfree

#CallsKill

*AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety
**Texas A&M Transportation Institute

Information for this post provided by the National Safety Council.

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes® has become UCA’s signature event in observance of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The university’s Interfraternity Council (IFC), the UCA Police Department, Office of Student Life, Division of Athletics and two community partners, Conway Women’s Shelter and HAVEN House, are organizing the walk.

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes® is the international men’s march to stop rape, sexual assault and gender violence.

Locally, participants will wear women’s high heel shoes to raise awareness about sexual violence, although individuals are not required to wear high heels to participate.

Male students, faculty, staff and female supporters will participate in a Walk a Mile in Her Shoes® event at 1:40 p.m., Thursday, April 2. The walk starts at the Crafton Alumni Pavilion/Football Practice Field on the UCA campus.

For more information about Walk a Mile in Her Shoes®, visit www.walkamileinhershoes.org.

Safe Spring Break 2015!

Safe Spring Break 2015 will take place prior to students leaving campus for Spring Break.  The events will consist of several activities designed to provide educational information to students in order to encourage responsible decision-making regarding alcohol and to prevent or reduce the risks involved in the college Spring Break experience. The university’s Health and Wellness Office, Counseling Services, Student Life, SGA, and the UCA Police Department are working together along with outside agencies to put on these events. Spring Break is the week of March 23.

SAFE SPRING BREAK 2015

 

MONDAY, MARCH 16

CAR CRASH SCENE DISPLAY – ALUMNI CIRCLE

How has alcohol impacted you? Students will have the chance to share their experiences with alcohol by writing them on a wrecked car set up on campus. The scene will bring attention to the dangers of drinking and driving by sharing news stories and providing a real-life look at the negative consequences alcohol can have. This display will be up Monday through Wednesday.

TUESDAY, MARCH 17

SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS VIDEO – STUDENT HEALTH CENTER 307, 1:40-2:30 PM

This powerful video addresses acquaintance rape, provides safety tips, and is specifically designed for college students.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18

FATAL VISION COURSE AND SAFETY FAIR – ALUMNI CIRCLE, 12:00-2:00 PM

Students will have the opportunity to ride pedal carts and play games while wearing “drunk goggles.” This activity is designed to inform students about alcohol impairment and discourage driving under the influence. Safe Spring Break tank tops will be given to participants. Student Health will be handing out free safety packs and sharing about how to avoid sexually transmitted infections, and the UCAPD will inform students of the legal consequences of drinking and driving. Staff from Sexual Assault Crisis Response, a division of the Conway Women’s Shelter, will be on hand to provide information and raise awareness about sexual assault.

“DON’T DRINK & DRIVE” PLEDGE – ALUMNI CIRCLE, 12:00-2:00 PM

Students can pledge that they will be responsible on Spring Break by not driving while intoxicated and using designated drivers.

THURSDAY, MARCH 19

SAFE PASSAGE VIDEO – STUDENT CENTER 223/224, 1:40-2:30 PM

This video addresses safety concerns for students traveling over spring break. Topics include hotel security, avoiding scams, and increasing overall personal safety in a different environment.

Arkansas Severe Weather Awareness Week-Friday

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson has proclaimed the week of March 1st through 7th as Severe Weather Awareness Week in Arkansas.

During Severe Weather Awareness Week the National Weather Service is asking people to think about what they would do and where they would go when severe weather threatens.

There will be a particular subject discussed each day.

Monday- Severe Thunderstorms
Tuesday- Methods of Receiving Severe Weather Information
Wednesday- Tornadoes
Thursday- Lightning
Friday- Flash Floods

FRIDAY – FLASH FLOODS

Please take some time to review our emergency procedures for severe weather and see the information below from the National Weather Service Little Rock office.

FLASH FLOODING IS USUALLY CAUSED BY VERY SLOW-MOVING THUNDERSTORMS…OR THUNDERSTORMS THAT REPEATEDLY MOVE OVER THE SAME AREAS.

URBAN SETTINGS ARE ESPECIALLY PRONE TO FLASH FLOODS DUE TO LARGE AMOUNTS OF CONCRETE AND ASPHALT SURFACES THAT DO NOT ALLOW WATER TO PENETRATE INTO THE SOIL.

PLACES SURROUNDED BY STEEP…HILLY TERRAIN ARE ALSO SUSCEPTIBLE TO FLASH FLOODS DUE TO RAPID RUNOFF /WATER MOVING DOWNHILL AT ELEVATED SPEEDS/ INTO STREAMS AND CREEKS.

IN THE LAST 30 YEARS…FLASH FLOODING WAS THE DEADLIEST THUNDERSTORM HAZARD…AND CAUSED MORE FATALITIES THAN TORNADOES AND LIGHTNING. THERE ARE AN AVERAGE OF 90 FATALITIES ANNUALLY DUE TO FLASH FLOODS ACROSS THE COUNTRY.

ROUGHLY HALF OF FLASH FLOOD DEATHS OCCUR WHEN PEOPLE TRY TO DRIVE THROUGH FLOODED AREAS. MOVING WATER TWO FEET DEEP IS SUFFICIENT TO CARRY AWAY MOST VEHICLES…EVEN PICKUP TRUCKS AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES.

IN ARKANSAS…MOST OF THE MAJOR FLASH FLOODS OCCUR AT NIGHT WHEN THE DANGER IS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT TO SEE. IN 2010… THE LITTLE MISSOURI RIVER ROSE MORE THAN 20 FEET DURING THE PREDAWN HOURS OF JUNE 11TH. THIS WAS AFTER MORE THAN HALF A FOOT OF RAIN. CAMPERS AT THE ALBERT PIKE RECREATION AREA /MONTGOMERY COUNTY/ WERE AWAKENED TO RAGING WATER…AND 20 PEOPLE DROWNED.

…FLASH FLOOD SAFETY RULES…

YOU SHOULD KNOW WHICH PLACES IN YOUR AREA ARE PRONE TO FLOODING…AND AVOID THESE PLACES IN TIMES OF RISING WATER.

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CROSS FLOWING STREAMS WHILE DRIVING OR ON FOOT.

IF FLOOD WATERS ARE BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR DESTINATION…THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WANTS YOU TO REMEMBER A SIMPLE SLOGAN: TURN AROUND – DONT DROWN.

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES ARE VERY POPULAR IN ARKANSAS. IF YOU ENJOY CAMPING OR SIMILAR RECREATION…BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL IF YOU SPEND THE NIGHT NEAR STREAMS. A THUNDERSTORM MILES UPSTREAM FROM YOUR LOCATION COULD PRODUCE ENOUGH RAIN TO CAUSE FLOODING…EVEN IF IT IS NOT RAINING MUCH WHERE YOU ARE.

NEVER ALLOW CHILDREN TO PLAY AROUND HIGH WATER…STORM DRAINS…AND CULVERTS.

Information for the page provided by the National Weather Service.