Course Descriptions and Goals

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

1310 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE WRITING Part of the lower-division UCA Core (general education) program and required of all students during the first semester they are eligible to enroll. This course introduces students to the writing process, focusing on audience, invention, and arrangement, and will be conducted as a workshop. Prerequisite: ACT score of 19 or higher or completion of UNIV 1300 with a grade of C or higher. Fall, spring, summer.

1310 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE WRITING OBJECTIVES

Rhetorical KnowledgeBy the end of Writing 1310, students should be able to:

  • Understand writing as a purposeful activity.
  • Understand and use personal experience appropriate to the rhetorical situation.
  • Recognize and respond to the needs of academic, professional, and other educated audiences.
  • Recognize and respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations.
  • Understand and use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation.
  • Acknowledge and adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality.
  • Understand how occasion, purpose, and audience shape reading and writing.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the various strategies for engaging in academic conversations, drawing on personal experiences and other sources.
  • Understand writing as a knowledge-creating activity.
Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing

By the end of Writing 1310, students should be able to:

  •  Use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating.
  • Engage in an ongoing conversation with the ideas of others.
  • Use language to accomplish goals.
  • Find, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize appropriate sources.

 

ProcessesBy the end of Writing 1310, students should be able to:

  •  Compose multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text.
  • Develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proof-reading.
  • Engage in writing as an open process that permits writers to use later invention and re-thinking to revise their work.
  • Employ the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes.
  • Critique their own and others' works.
  • Write a well-organized essay that offers a clear thesis and effectively supports and develops that thesis.
  • Compose in a variety of types of discourse, from narrative to analytical to persuasive.

 

 

ConventionsBy the end of Writing 1310, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of common patterns of organization appropriate to different occasions, purposes, and audiences, such as chronological and climactic order.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of discourse conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics.
  • Demonstrate control of such surface features as grammar, punctuation, and spelling.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles for integrating source materials into their writing, including a) the ability to use quotations and paraphrases without violating principles of fair usage and b) the ability to provide in-text documentation and MLA or APA bibliographic entries.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of common strategies of development, such as exemplification and elaboration.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

1320 ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH Part of the lower-division UCA Core (general education) program and required of all students during the first semester they are eligible to enroll. The course introduces students to academic argument based on substantiating, evaluating, and proposing claims. Research strategies are central to the course, which will be conducted as a workshop. Prerequisite. WRTG 1310 with a grade of C or higher. Fall, spring, summer.

1320 ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH COURSE OBJECTIVES

Knowledge Area

  • Students will develop their understanding of writing’s relationship to academic inquiry.
  • Students will learn the nature and benefits of the writing process when applied to research-related writing projects.
  • Students will understand the practical value of focused, strategic, and comprehensive revision.
  • Students will examine the characteristics of academic conversations and engage an academic audience.
  • Students will learn the concepts, principles and vocabulary of reasoning and argumentation and how analysis, synthesis, and evaluation work to advance arguments.
  • Students will explore rhetorically persuasive arrangements of source information and of their own ideas in order to advance an argument.
  • Students will expand their understanding of scholarly presentation and further evolve in their knowledge of academic writing and research approaches within particular disciplinary discourse communities.
  • Students will become more aware of their inclusion in and responsibility to the academic community.
Skills Area

  • Students will become proficient at identifying types of resources necessary to formulate a researchable question.
  • Students will become proficient at assessing the quality and utility of various kinds of resources for academic research.
  • Students will become proficient at formulating conclusions based on the results of their research.
  • Students will become proficient at incorporating expert opinion to support the claims they have developed
  • Students will become proficient at incorporating source material using accepted forms of scholarly citation.
  • Students will become proficient at communicating their research findings to an academic audience.