Calculus Competition

IMG_0892The annual calculus competition is organized by the math club every year since its first run in 2014. Targeted at students in calculus I, II, and III, teams compete against each other to solve problems as quickly as possible.

2017 Competition:

The 2017 competition will take place on November 16th at 4pm in the Math Resource Lab. The tournament will take approximately one hour. Teams may consist of up to 3 students that have not yet taken advanced calculus. Each member of the winning team receives a $15 gift card, as well as an invitation to compete at Math Jeopardy at the 2018 Mathematical Association of America’s Arkansas conference.

Competition Format:

  • One problem is given at a time.
  • The points and time available vary from problem to problem.
  • Each team that finds the correct answer within the time limit receives points for that problem.
  • Teams may have up to 3 people.
  • All problems are at the calculus I level. (Yes, calculus II and III students are also competing. They’ve had more math, but haven’t been studying calculus I type problems so we assume these effects mitigate each other.)

Problem Categories:

  • Fundamentals
  • Limits
  • Derivatives
  • Integrals
  • Applications
  • Historical context

Champion Archives

Year Course Enrolled In Students
2014 Calculus III – Dr. Carmack ???
2015 Calculus I – Dr. Le Lindsey Hazeslip
Connor Wilson
Azaryah Wilson
2016 Calculus III – Dr. Liu Lindsey Hazeslip
Connor Wilson
Azaryah Wilson

 

 

2016 Competition Format:

  • One problem is given at a time.
  • The points and time available vary from problem to problem.
  • Each team that finds the correct answer within the time limit receives points for that problem.
  • Teams may have up to 3 people.
  • All problems are at the calculus I level. (Yes, calculus II and III students are also competing. They’ve had more math, but haven’t been studying calculus I type problems so we assume these effects mitigate each other.)

2014-2015 Competition Format:

  • One problem is given at a time.
  • The points and time available vary from problem to problem.
  • The first team with the correct answer receives the points for that problem.
  • Teams may have up to 3 people.
  • All problems are at the calculus I level. (Yes, calculus II and III students are also competing. They’ve had more math, but haven’t been studying calculus I type problems so we assume these effects mitigate each other.)