Education by Design: The History and Design of Little Rock Central High School and Dunbar Jr./Sr. High School

  • 5:00 p.m., Reception: Pyramid Art, Books, & Custom Framing / Hearne Fine Art, 1–1 Wright Avenue, Little Rock (across the street from Dunbar Magnet Middle School)
  • 5:50 p.m., Unveiling and Exhibit: Works by Dunbar and Central High students, Sculpture Garden, Dunbar Magnet Middle School, 1100 Wright Avenue, Little Rock (behind the school building
  • 6:00 p.m., Lecture: Dunbar Magnet Middle School, 1100 Wright Avenue, Little Rock (across the street from Hearne Fine Art)

June Freeman Lecture Series will stop at Dunbar Magnet Middle School as part of the University of Central Arkansas events commemorating the 60th anniversary of the desegregation crisis at Little Rock Central High School. “Education by Design: The History and Design of Little Rock Central High School and Dunbar Junior/Senior High School,” a lecture by Kwendeche, Little Rock architect and Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and Mason Toms, Main Street Arkansas exterior design consultant and architectural historian, is set for Sept. 21 at 6 p.m. at Dunbar, 1100 Wright Ave. in Little Rock.

The lecture is presented by ADN (Architecture + Design Network), Central Arkansas section of the Arkansas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the American Society of Interior Designers and sponsored by Pyramid Art Books and Custom Framing/Hearne Fine Art and Curtis Stout Audio Visual. Admission is free. A reception at Pyramid Art, Books, and Custom Framing/Hearne Fine Art, 1001 Wright Avenue, will precede the lecture at 5 p.m.

Parking is available at Hearne Fine Art and the Sue Cowan Williams Library at 1800 Chester Street.

“Dunbar Junior and Senior High School and Junior College was the original African-American school in Little Rock, named after American poet and novelist Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906)” said Dr. Gayle Seymour, project director for ‘Imagine If Buildings Could Talk’ and associate dean of the UCA College of Fine Arts and Communication. “The school was constructed in 1929, designed, engineered, and built by the same architects who completed two years earlier what is now Central High School— Wittenberg and Delony of Little Rock.” “We are so pleased this lecture could be held in the actual building. Many people in the area may not have seen the beautiful auditorium, where the lecture will be held.”

The lecture is part of the UCA College of Fine Arts and Communication’s commemoration of the 90th anniversary of the building of Little Rock Central High School in 1927 and the 60th anniversary of the desegregation crisis that occurred there in 1957 through the “Imagine If Buildings Could Talk: Mapping the History of Little Rock Central High School” project.


This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Gayle Seymour at gayles@uca.edu or call 501-450-3295.