Regulation

ACRE Research Papers:

The Effects of Arkansas’ Occupational Licensure Regulations by Dr. Thomas Snyder

Arkansas’ extensive occupational licensure requirements hurt the state’s economy, particularly harming the state’s poor. Governments require some occupations to be licensed, making it illegal to work in one of these trades without a license. Arkansas not only requires many occupations to be licensed, but it also has the second-highest average burden—in terms of time and money—imposed on the licensed occupations, second only to Hawaii. In other words, not only does Arkansas require licensure of more categories of workers than most states do, the difficulty of acquiring each license in Arkansas is especially burdensome when compared to other states.

Policy Reviews:

Unnatural Rights in the Natural State by Dr. David Mitchell, Dr. Thomas Snyder, and Ms. Amy Fontinelle

In this review, the authors examine which occupations have the most burdensome licensing laws, how these restrictions affect job seekers, entrepreneurs, and consumers; and how we can reform the worst parts of these regulations.

Policy Briefs:

Primary Care and Nurse Practitioners in Arkansas by Dr. David Mitchell, Jordan Pfaff, and Zachary Helms – Please contact us if you would like a copy of this brief.

map iconDistribution of Primary Care Physicians and Alternatives in Arkansas

Like the rest of the country, Arkansas faces a growing shortage of primary health care providers. One of the most promising approaches to alleviating this shortage is to expand the use of nurse practitioners.  Nurse practitioners are trained to provide primary care and research shows to be as effective as physicians in providing primary care. Arkansas regulations restrict nurse practitioner’s ability to practice independently, diminishing nurse practitioners’ ability to meet Arkansans’ primary care needs.  This policy brief examines access to primary care in Arkansas, current restrictions on the use of nurse practitioners, and the magnitude of diabetes-related costs in the state that could be alleviated by expanding nurse practitioners’ scope of practice.

Commentary:

  • ACRE Director Dr. David Mitchell testified on February 16, 2017 before the Arkansas House Public Health, Welfare & Labor Committee regarding the potential savings the state could generate by allowing nurse practitioners to provide primary care to Medicaid patients. The bill, HB1182, failed to get the 11 votes it needed to pass getting only 10 “for” and 9 “against”.
  • The Review of Scope of Practice Rules in Arkansas and Task Switching. Testimony (read here) and power point presentation (click here) from ACRE Director, Dr. David Mitchell, PhD for the Arkansas State Legislature Joint Performance Review Committee Meeting on November 9, 2015.
  • Dr. David Mitchell provided expert commentary in an amicus brief on occupational licencing regulations concerning hair braiders. Read the full amicus brief here.

News/Media:

  • For More Freedom op-ed published September 19, 2015 by ACRE Director Dr. David Mitchell. Arkansas Democrat Gazette and Arkansas Online.

Blog Posts:

Understanding Why Firms Hire: Minimum Wage Debate

Stimulate Job Creation and Economic Development while Preserving Health and Safety Standards HB-1158 Commentary by Dr. David Mitchell

Protecting the Public through Contracting Licensure: A Tale of Three Homes